By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://www.nwr.org.uk/

Scrapbook Project

NWR 2020 Scrapbook Project

**Notice***  WE ARE PAUSING THE SCRAPBOOKS UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.  THE CO-ORDINATORS HAVE BEEN INFORMED AND WILL BE IN TOUCH WITH GROUPS TO ADVISE WHEN WE CAN CONTINUE.

pause the scrapbooks until further notice and that co-ordinators have been informed and will be in touch when we can continue.

pause the scrapbooks until further notice and that co-ordinators have been informed and will be in touch when we can continue.

The Scrapbook project is part of the Diamond Anniversary celebrations. Please find some information which may answer any questions you may have. 

NWR groups have been divided into 8 regions; Central, Eastern, Midlands, North East, North West, Scotland, South East and South West plus the independent members. Each Region has a Regional Co-ordinator who will be responsible for all the groups in their area. 

They have all been issued with A3 paper and an art carrier for safekeeping the pages in. Each co-ordinator will be responsible for planning a 'route' for the scrapbooks between the groups in their area. The plan is that your group will have two weeks in which to complete your entry.  Ideally, the scrapbooks will be handed over in person from group to group, where possible, to encourage a feeling of interconnection and of being part of a National Organisation.  If not, other ways of forwarding will be worked out. 

Please be patient with your co-ordinators who will begin to notify groups of when they will receive the scrapbooks shortly. The number of groups in each region ranges from 32 to 76 so it may be some time before it reaches your group. 

What happens when the 'scrapbook' reaches your group? You may already be aware that they are not actual books but sheets of A3 paper which will be combined and bound to form books.  

  • In your turn, the A2 art carrier containing the blank sheets and any completed sheets will be delivered to you.
  • Each group should take 2 sheets of the same colour paper and complete it in PORTRAIT style.
  • The content is entirely up to your group but try and aim for 50% images and 50% words.... Possibly a link with 1960 and now......Be creative and make it look attractive........ include e.g. reports, poems, photos, anything you feel reflects your group (but not just 'we did this', 'we did that'). You can choose your own font, size for words and colour of words.
  • For ideas see the NWR Pinterest site at…                                                 

 https://www.pinterest.co.uk/nwrorguk/nwr-uk-2020-scrapbook-project 

  • The only stipulation is that a one-and-a-half-inch border MUST be left at the edge to be bound. The other three sides should have a 1-inch border, or slightly less as long as nothing overhangs the paper. 
  • The pages will be in the form of a double page spread and only one side of each piece is to be used. To use both sides could cause a problem with glue seepage etc. When the scrapbooks are ready for binding and completion, the blank sides will be clipped together in some way, but this is not something the groups need to concern themselves with. 
  • Please ensure your group name is included somewhere on the pages.
  • Also, in the A2 carrier will be some A3 plastic wallets. Once your pages are completed, please place them with blank sides together and put them behind previously completed pages. This will enable other groups to have a look without needing to take them out of the wallet and risking tearing them. 
  • Your co-ordinator will tell you who the 'scrapbook' is to be passed on to.

It is anticipated that the project is completed by the end of 2020 and will be available to view at the 2021 Conference. Ultimately it will be presented to The Women's Library, where our archives are stored.

We hope you will all enjoy filling in your pages and look forward to seeing what NWR means to you!

0
  0 Comments
Tags:
0 Comments

Poring over the Past – NWR at the Women’s Library

Poring over the Past – NWR at the Women’s Library

This week our chair of trustees, Josephine Burt, along with National Organiser Natalie Punter and Mary Stott Award winner (and former National Organiser) Antoinette Ferraro visited the Women's Library at the London School of Economics (LSE). This library holds records of the women’s’ movement in 19th and 20th centuries including the NHR/NWR archives.  Here's what she had to say.

Antoinette, Natalie and I recently spent a wonderfully interesting day at The Women’s Library (part of the British Library and currently housed at the London School Of Economics, LSE, in Central London) looking at 60 years of NWR heritage.

The Women's Library houses England’s primary library and museum resource on women, women’s issues and history, and the women’s movement from, primarily, the 19th and 20th centuries. The main collection dates back to the mid-1920s, though the core collection was formed from a library established by Ruth Cavendish Bentinck in 1909. These archives moved to LSE, as part of the British Library collection, in 2013.

We had the opportunity to view photos and marketing materials dating back to the early 60s even the official annual reports and financial returns, though we decided to leave those for another day!

It was lovely to see photos of the women who set up and ran the organisation from 1980 - having read the book that details our first twenty years 1960-1980 (“The Lively-Minded Women” by Betty Jerman published in 1980) and it was great to see the original materials upon which it was based. Antoinette was delighted to find some photos of the National Group in the 1980's which included her.

Some of the publicity materials looked very dated, as they would, but the Golden Anniversary literature (from 2010) looked fresh and vibrant. We also found a hidden gem – a poster from the 1960s – which we are thinking of rejuvenating for our anniversary! (watch this space).  It was sobering and yet reassuring to find that the problems and issues we have today have been there over the years and are really a feature of informal organisations such as ours.

I felt very nostalgic when I found some local press cuttings from Leighton Buzzard from the 1980's and recognised the names of friends I met through NWR. I’d like to thank our members and LOs for keeping such excellent records of our history and I think we owe it to the next generation of NWR to ensure we continue to send in materials from the last 10 years and onwards.

For those of you (individually or as a group) who would like to see the archives for yourselves NWR members are welcome to visit by appointment - see http://www.lse.ac.uk/library/collection-highlights/the-womens-library or call LSE Library 020 7955 7229

Josephine Burt, Chair of Trustees


Celebrating 60 years of the National Women’s Register and the National Housewive’s Register – 1960-2020

 National Conference 2020 – Precious Gems - A Celebration! 11th-13th September 2020

#NWRDiamondDays #NWRdiamondconf2020 #LivelyMindedWomen

0
  0 Comments
0 Comments

Equality and accessibility - NWR's commitment to you.

This year NWR made a commitment to our members to improve our accessibility as an organisation, including our responsibilities under the Equalities Act and financial accessibility, and to become and remain a Carbon Neutral organisation.

One initiative, launched in April, is the NWR members’ hardship fund. This is designed to ensure that members are never forced to leave NWR due to financial issues, illness etc. It also allows potential new members to receive subsidised membership, should hardship otherwise prevent them from joining.Our first hardship fund applicant came almost immediately via Susan, an LO.

Susan explained that a longstanding member, Belinda, had become seriously unwell and, when group subs renewals came around, found herself in difficulties. Her group felt — as I would — that it would be inappropriate to approach Belinda or her husband. So, what to do? Previously Belinda’s membership would have lapsed, along with that all-important connection with other women through our organisation’s local groups, regional events and conferences, regular newsletters and magazines and, of course, our very popular national conferences.

Fortunately, LO Susan knew about our new hardship fund and approached me directly. We discussed what NWR meant to Belinda and the nature of her illness. I decided to grant a three-month membership subsidy. Three months rolled by and Susan and I spoke again. Belinda had approached the group to ask about remaining a member and, to our delight, she said “Of course I want to stay!” Happy Days!

However, this isn’t about NWR or about one NWR group losing a member: it’s about making sure that women who want or need to be connected to likeminded women may do so - regardless of financial restrictions. Sitting at home today you might not consider that the loss of one member, long-term or new, matters - but it matters to them and it matters to me.

I am delighted to be with NWR to celebrate the diamond 60th anniversary and I am excited to see what we can do to involve as many women as possible in the years to come. So, as you peruse the magazine and attend your meetings, please think “What can I do, in my group or as an individual, to make sure that the objectives of NWR — to connect, to educate and intellectually stimulate women in my community — are honoured?” We all need to be thinking back over the past (nearly) 60 years and asking “What did I need?” and “What can I do now?”

Happy 59 and a halfth anniversary, and I look forward to seeing you all next year! AMH 

1
  0 Comments
0 Comments

South West Salisbury Visit

Ten NWR friends recently visited Salisbury and enjoyed an informative walk around the fantastic Cathedral Close on Monday morning. The tour was lead by member Liz who told us many interesting facts about many of the houses.... the history, famous visitors and residents and the ghosts!

The sun was shining for (at least part of) the day and we enjoyed a jolly lunch in the Cathedral Refectory.

What a wonderful day! Please let us know what other events NWR members are enjoying around the country!

0
  0 Comments
Tags:
578
0 Comments

Woodstock 50th Anniversary

Woodstock 50th Anniversary

We became hippies (once again) to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Woodstock festival held in August 1969. We travelled back in time using online contemporary photographs of the 400,000 festival goers and the farm in Bethel, New York, where it all happened and video recordings of musical artists such as Joan Baez, Jimmy Hendrix, Joe Cocker and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. We even had hippy and 1960’s food, including lentil bake, vegetable stew, cheese and pineapple on sticks and arctic roll. What a groovy time we all had!!

Heather

 

 

 

 

0
  0 Comments
Tags:
298
0 Comments

Pottery Painting

Pottery Painting

A number of us spent a pleasant evening being creative at a local Pottery Painting cafe recently.  Apart from mugs and bowls we decorated an NWR Diamond Anniversary plate to be used at evening meetings for biscuits.

0
  0 Comments
Tags:
298
0 Comments

Lepe Country Park

Lepe Country Park

Ladies from Sway NWR visited the Country Park on 4th June, the day before the 75th anniversary of the D Day landings.Lepe played a big part in preparations for the landing and the board in the photograph tells the story. we enjoyed a pleasant walk along the beach before retiring to the Lookout for a well deserved cream tea.

0
  0 Comments
0 Comments

NWR MK Outing to the Canal Museum, Stoke Bruerne

  Authentication required.

This is a password protected blog, please kindly enter the password into the password field below to view the blog.

Diamonds Are Forever! Capturing NWR's Photographic Gems!

Diamonds Are Forever! Capturing NWR's Photographic Gems!

Get Your Cameras Out For Our NWR Competition!

NWR are pleased to announce the launch of our Photographic competition – with twelve winning images being immortalised in a commemorative calendar to be released in celebration of our diamond anniversary in 2020.

So, what do you need to do?

First of all dust off your camera, refresh your skills while you're out and about, and get your creative juices flowing!

There are four categories:

  • "I get by with a little help from my friends"
  • "The more things change, the more they stay the same
  • Women of the world; and
  • A visual interpretation of a poem/song

We can accept pictures taken on any device but all images must be available, and submitted, in colour. If you wish to use film you may but the image should be initially submitted in a high-specification digital format. All images must be scaleable to A3. You may submit multiple entries to each category. Images will be judged by a panel of professional photographer, NWR’s Membership and Communications Coordinator and the NWR magazine editor.

Photographs will be judged on composition, focus, clarity, colour depth, overall image quality, creativity and relevance to the brief/topic.

How to create a winning image?

Think about the brief. Be smart and use your imagination. De-clutter the image and focus on what your picture is about then fill the frame with it. Practice, Practice, Practice! Start taking your camera wherever you go and take photos every day – no matter how good a photographer you are we all get a little rusty.

Be original. Equipment, even on a phone, is incredible these days – the one thing you can always use to stand out is your own creativity. Put something of yourself in the image. Two photographers can shoot the same subject in the exact same conditions and produce totally different images.

How? By inserting your interpretation and your perspective. Shoot what you love. Use The Golden Triangle or rule of thirds – nature is based upon these magical mathematical rules and they will elevate your work too. Don’t centre your subject (usually). Use space.

Simplify and exaggerate – you may wish to use contrasting colours, juxtaposition with other objects, even shutter speed to give a well-defined image/scene. Create depth and use leading lines to draw the viewer in and create a journey through the image.

Lighting is everything! Never shoot into the sun/ in the middle of the day unless you REALLY know what you’re doing. Understand the “temperature” of the light. Use the golden hours at sunrise and sunset – the light is beautiful. Edit yourself ruthlessly!

Closing date 31/07/20. Terms and conditions apply. Full competition rules will eventually be available on the website.

0
  1 Comment
Tags:
Recent comment in this post
Marie Morrison
Camera out and ready to go !
Friday, 21 June 2019 20:00
1 Comment

The Power of Wood

The Power of Wood

On 20th March we were all treated to a wonderful afternoon talk by Susanne Gundermann, the sister of one of our members. Susanne is a qualified carpenter working at the Architecture Faculty of Hannover University. She has pursued her passion for trees and wood for three decades and produces the most beautiful and intriguing objects (many of geometrical precision) out of dfferent kinds of wood. Fascinating and beautiful!
[Information about Susanne Gundermann]

0
  0 Comments
Tags:
138
0 Comments

Women, beget women!

Women, beget women!

NWR was established to enable women who were at home with small children to connect with other women and, from time to time, members tell me that "women don't need this any more".

I disagree.

I have at various times in my life been at home with a small child; been caring for an adult family member, working in a male-dominated environment, working alone from home; and I have moved to a new area where I knew no-one. It is these women, women like me, that we are reaching out to now!

Women can find it particularly challenging in this day and age to maintain and begin new friendships. There are hundreds of dating websites, and dating - including speed-dating - events across the country but where does a woman go who just wants to talk? Or walk? To keep her mind active? To find kindred spirits? They come - we hope - to NWR.

So, on International Women's Day, look at you group and ask - are we providing that friendly, welcoming environment that enabled us to join 10, 15 - even 30 years ago?
Here at NWR we are reaching out to women countrywide through local radio and television, local open-evening events, and by making sure that we can start to get our name known as a space where "you can do you"

Finally, if you want help attracting new members to your area just let me know! 

 

 

1
  0 Comments
0 Comments

PUBLIC ART SINCE THE 1950s

As this was a suggestion of mine, inspired by a pic of me lolling by a sculpture on a school Geography trip almost 45 years ago, I've been asked to write a short resume of the meeting. It certainly was an animated evening!


My request was for us all to think about art in the public domain, from the post WW2 period, so something that is accessible to all that we could bring to everyone's attention. I asked the following questions: is there a piece that we love or hate and does it enhance our lives, so would we miss it if it disappeared? Or, can you not wait to see the back of it and bring in the bulldozers?! Did we have something foisted upon us in the name of public art, or was it a good idea?
Public art isn't always ‘modern art’, but very often can be and, I also widened the suggestions to perhaps include examples of architecture eg an outdoor facade or an atrium indoors, but still a public place. Statues, sculptures, murals, buildings; we have them all around us. I had originally just thought of British art, but we widened the scope and had some very interesting examples from elsewhere. This gave us some different angles on how others perceive art and its uses in the public space, for instance, propaganda.
Initially we discussed a sense of belonging and a sense of place. Can public art help us with this and enhance our lives? We felt that, generally, yes it can and therefore, is a good thing in that respect. Examples were given of the Angel of the North, the Poppies at the Tower of London and a future project, the Lancaster Bomber memorial to be erected on the A46 near Lincoln.
Not surprisingly, we focused on art in around Grantham, beginning with the 1.6 million given for the rejuvenation of Grantham market place and the installation of the Orrery. This was felt to be an example of how money had not been well spent to enhance the area! We also looked at art in the surrounding villages and thought that there were some commendable examples, such as murals, and at least the attempts were appreciated. However, the installation of an empty plinth and a gibbet left us somewhat bemused! The Moon installation that visited St Wulfram's was described as beautiful and inspirational.
We discussed a Guardian article that suggested the six worst examples in Britain. These were the dead tree; the Scallop; the Manchester starburst; figures at Newbiggin; the Gloucester tower; footprint in North Wales. We concluded that whilst we agreed with some of them, several were good instances and, on the whole, we disagreed with the article.
Other examples we came up with included:
 The statue at Dickie Lewis's department store, Liverpool
 Matthew Flinders’ statue, Euston station – the Lincolnshire ‘connection’!
 Banksy and the merits of art against commercialism
 The travelling exhibition of the knives sculpture
 Treviso fountain, Italy
 Antony Gormley – Angel of the North and his other works; message and meaning
 Tucson, Arizona and the amazing murals on their buildings
 Lewes, East Sussex, the Knights' Helm – that school trip!
We didn't come to any firm decisions as to which should stay and which should go, as we all felt differently about each one. The general opinion was that we would be worst off for not having Public Art, if only to have a good moan, which at least proves we've noticed it!
I was amazed at the amount of effort and research everyone had put in and I would like to thank you all for your time and contributions – some even from another Continent! I certainly think we achieved what I set out for lively minded women to do, have a very enthusiastic discussion!
Kay Ellerby

0
  0 Comments
Tags:
298
0 Comments

Dereham & District enjoying a walk at Oxborough Hall

  Authentication required.

This is a password protected blog, please kindly enter the password into the password field below to view the blog.

Heavy Metal

Heavy Metal

On Wednesday evening our Bury St Edmunds group invited members from Diss, along with some of our friends and family, to listen to a talk given by local sculptor HARRIET MEAD.  Harriet is a hugely talented, internationally respected wildlife artist from Norfolk who works with 'found objects' made of metal - tools, kitchen utensils, bits of agricultural machinery etc - and creates the most wonderful sculptures of birds, mammals, fish and insects. Using items like rotor blades, spanners, pliers, spades, egg-whisks, scissors, nuts and bolts, she can recreate almost anything from a life-sized horse, through hares, curlew and pike, to a dragonfly on a reed!
She fascinated us with explanations of where her inspiration comes from, described the way she welds the metal together to make a creature, showed us photographs of some of the many things she has made, and told of projects she has been involved with – including the Society of Wildlife Artists (SWLA) of which she is currently President. We agreed with her that it’s ridiculous that some people are still astounded when they find a woman donning protective gear and flourishing welding equipment!
Working mostly to commission, she is hugely in demand and certainly not wanting for work. You may have seen her on ‘Countryfile’, and she is often asked to feature in programmes for ‘discovery’ channels.

Harriet 3

0
  0 Comments
Tags:
138
0 Comments

Sheffield Crookes NWR out and about

  Authentication required.

This is a password protected blog, please kindly enter the password into the password field below to view the blog.

New group in Milton Keynes

  Authentication required.

This is a password protected blog, please kindly enter the password into the password field below to view the blog.

The Gondoliers

  Authentication required.

This is a password protected blog, please kindly enter the password into the password field below to view the blog.

Which NWR group describe themselves as "a very lively, noisy and friendly group with a good range of interests"?

Shoreham 1

We are the Shoreham (1) group based in Shoreham-by-Sea on the Sussex coast between Brighton and Worthing. Our group has 16 members currently and we are looking to recruit new members. We are a very lively, noisy and friendly group with a good range of interests.

Our meetings usually take place in the evenings and in 2018 we enjoyed the following - “Bag Lady” (5 items in a bag, guess the owner), Anti-Bucket List, My personality in a collage, What’s in the newspapers?, Talk about someone famous who shares your birthday, Pictures of members in past fashions, Unexplained happenings, Guess the year (5 clues), Talk from local charity, 4sight and Interesting Pub names. A few months ago at our ‘Time Travel’ evening we welcomed our area organisers, Jenny and Marilyn.

We’ve recently enjoyed a talk on aromatherapy, lunch at a local college prepared and served by the students, a pottery painting evening at a local garden centre and a craft evening. We also enjoyed a pre-Christmas buffet with Secret Santa presents – the budget was £5 and gifts had to be bought from a charity shop. Other than our evening meetings we have a monthly coffee morning, restaurant visits (an annual post-Christmas meal), a book group plus visits to museums and gardens, including NGS ones. We have also played croquet, an area event and have joined the Shoreham 2 NWR group for shared events

Last summer we went to Driftwood, the amazing award-winning coastal garden in Seaford, owned by Geoff Stonebanks. After a talk where we learned it takes Geoff seven hours over two days to water his plants, we visited each corner of the garden before sitting down to tea and cake made by him. “A perfect summer’s day in a beautiful garden” and “an inspirational garden” to quote two of our members.

Lorraine Nightingale and Cathy Ford, Shoreham 1 NWR group.

2
  0 Comments
0 Comments

Hello from Hatfield!

We are the Hatfield group from Hertfordshire.

The question of when we started caused some debate among the original members we still have. The consensus was we split away from another groups in about 1970. We currently have 19 members.

We try to meet weekly and in the past 6 months our activities have included research on Paddington Bear, mistresses, Romania and things beginning with A. We have shared poetry on the sea and readings on gardens. We have discussed idioms without ignoring the elephant in the room. Speakers have talked on Human Rights and Stonehenge. We have discussed a variety of books, some more popular than others. Outings have included a walk round Surrey Docks, lunch at a local pub (with discussion topic) and a visit to look at church graffiti.

We look forward in the next 6 months to a programme with quizzes, talks, book, plays and poetry on winter, as well as discussions, including something beginning with B. We clearly have a topic that will last some time! Do contavt us to find out more about our group if you would like to join us!

0
  0 Comments
0 Comments

Horbury and Ossett's Great British Bake Off!

Horbury and Ossett's Great British Bake Off!

Horbury and Ossett NWR recently welcomed 2018 Great British Bake-Off Contestant Karen Wright to a special meeting.

We were delighted to welcome Karen Wright, contestant in this year’s Great British Bake-Off to our recent meeting. Karen grew up not far away in Featherstone, West Yorkshire. Her entertaining talk came about thanks to a family connection and with the series aired and winner announced she was now able to speak freely.

Karen describes herself as a self-taught baker and stalker of French patisserie window displays. From the thousands who applied Karen really didn’t expect to get selected for the final twelve. She gave us an insight into the application process. The first stage was a lengthy form with questions about baking experience, including everything from hot water crust pastry to bread. She set about teaching herself to do those things she couldn’t do. After sending in the application a researcher rang for a lengthy chat, including technical questions about baking. This lead to a regional selection day. For this Karen had to make two things in advance. It was for this she realised that you needed to go in with confidence regardless of nerves underneath. After all they were looking for a mix of people who could bake and appear on television. A few days later she heard she had been chosen for a further selection day in London. It was on the train to London that she first recognised Kim Joy from the earlier regional selection. In the end Yorkshire was well represented in the programme.

 

Once selected contestants received lots of information on what would be required at each stage of filming. This gave them time to practice ideas. Filming took place on two long intensive days over weekends during the summer. All the contestants were excited to meet up and finally get into the tent for the first time. The tent is actually full of film crews following each contestant. Two days filming is all edited down to an hour’s programme.

 

What was perhaps most inspiring was how Karen had seen it as a personal challenge, showing her that she could achieve much more than she imagined. She brought along her designs and photos of her cakes showing us her innate creativity. Karen is not sure where it will all lead, but she is already in demand for talks and demonstrations locally and has set up her own website. She will be appearing next year at the well-known Wakefield Rhubarb Festival in February. She is more than anything keen to inspire others young and old to try something new. Maybe we all need to follow her lead and pick a personal challenge for 2019 and reach outside our comfort zone!

 

We had decided in advance that those who wanted would be asked to make three scones to a recipe of our choosing. Our competition for the evening was not against the clock, but there was still a bit of pressure to come up with presentable scones for the evening. We had a good selection of both savoury and sweet ones and it showed how creative you can be, even with the humble scone. Karen was happy to judge our efforts.

Our member Thérése Manship was the winner. Here’s her winning recipe:

Christmas Scones

 

·         2 medium eggs

·         1 tsp vanilla extract

·         500g (18oz) plain flour

·         25g (1oz) baking power  

·         75g (3oz) golden caster sugar

·         finely grated zest of 1 orange

·         finely grated zest of 1 lemon

·         125g (4 ½ oz) unsalted butter chilled and diced

·         200g mixed fruit

·         Buttermilk, see recipe.

1. Whisk the eggs with the vanilla in a small bowl. Sift the flour and baking powder into the bowl of a food processor and add the sugar and zest. Add the butter and whiz to crumbs, then add the egg mixture and just enough buttermilk to bring the mixture together. Transfer to a large bowl and mix in the dried fruit. You can always add a little more buttermilk if the mixture appears dry and crumbly, but take care not to overdo it otherwise the scones will spread. 

2. Roll the dough out 2cm (¾ in) thick on a lightly floured worksurface and cut out scones using a 6.5 cm (2 ¾ in) cutter. Space well apart on one or two non-stick baking sheets and leave to rest for 20 minutes. 


3. Heat the oven to 200C/180C fan/gas 6, then brush the top of the scones with milk and bake for 17-22 minutes until golden (the lower tray may take a little longer than the top). 

The runner-up Angela Beardshall made cheese, pumpkin and poppy seeds scones with a rhubarb and ginger chutney.

We'd like to thank Karen for a most entertaining night!

You can find out more about Karen and future events, or contact her via her website:
www.karenwrightbakes.co.uk

You can also follow her on Instagram or Twitter @karenwrightbake

0
  0 Comments
Tags:
361
0 Comments