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South West Salisbury Visit

Ten NWR friends recently visited Salisbury and enjoyed an informative walk around the fantastic Cathedral Close on Monday morning. The tour was lead by member Liz who told us many interesting facts about many of the houses.... the history, famous visitors and residents and the ghosts!

The sun was shining for (at least part of) the day and we enjoyed a jolly lunch in the Cathedral Refectory.

What a wonderful day! Please let us know what other events NWR members are enjoying around the country!

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Honorary Membership

Honorary Membership & Award of Honorary Membership 

The National Women’s Register (NWR) may grant the status of Honorary Membership in specific circumstances largely intended to reward those who have a substantial role in promoting NWR at regional and national level and whose contribution of work or service has been of great value to the organisation.

Criteria

Potential recipients should have one or more of the following criteria in order to be nominated:

  • Significant years (e.g. 10 or more) as a volunteer such as 
  • member of the National Group/Committee up to 1999
  • Area Organiser supporting local groups, setting up new groups, arranging area events and generally encouraging new and existing members.
  • Significant years (e.g. 10 or more) in any other voluntary role eg special interest group organiser, social media ambassador etc that has contributed to the development and enhancement of NWR for members
  • Any other input e.g. journalistic, that has raised the profile of NWR, encouraged new members and brought value and benefits to NWR membership

In making nominations members may consider: 
•    Will a significant proportion of the membership of NWR within the recipients region or nationally recognise the name of the Honorary Member and understand, without explanation, why they have received the honour? 
•    Will awarding of the name of Honorary Member with NWR bring benefit (status by association) to NWR either in the UK or overseas? 
•    Will the recipient of Honorary Membership understand and appreciate the honour being bestowed? 

Rewards

The benefits to Honorary Members include: 

  • Honorary members will receive free membership for life 
  • Formal recognition of their contribution in any NWR publicity and at any events they attend
  • A Certificate of Honorary Membership   

Obligations 

The benefits to NWR include: 

  • The right of continuing dialogue and engagement with the Honorary Member 
  • Benefits from access to their expertise and advocacy
  • Potential for their support (e.g. as a mentor, policy advice)

 

 

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Diamonds are forever! Capturing NWR's photographic gems!

Diamonds are forever! Capturing NWR's photographic gems!

Get your cameras out for the first NWR competition of 2019!

NWR are pleased to announce the launch of the 2019 Photographic competition – with twelve winning images being immortalised in a commemorative calendar to be released in celebration of our diamond anniversary in 2020.

So, what do you need to do?

First of all dust off your camera, refresh your skills while you're out and about, and get your creative juices flowing!

There are four categories:

  • "I get by with a little help from my friends"
  • "The more things change, the more they stay the same
  • Women of the world; and
  • A visual interpretation of a poem/song

We can accept pictures taken on any device but all images must be available, and submitted, in colour. If you wish to use film you may but the image should be initially submitted in a high-specification digital format. All images must be scaleable to A3. You may submit multiple entries to each category. Images will be judged by a panel of professional photographer, NWR’s Membership and Communications Coordinator and the NWR magazine editor.

Photographs will be judged on composition, focus, clarity, colour depth, overall image quality, creativity and relevance to the brief/topic.

How to create a winning image?

Think about the brief. Be smart and use your imagination. De-clutter the image and focus on what your picture is about then fill the frame with it. Practice, Practice, Practice! Start taking your camera wherever you go and take photos every day – no matter how good a photographer you are we all get a little rusty.

Be original. Equipment, even on a phone, is incredible these days – the one thing you can always use to stand out is your own creativity. Put something of yourself in the image. Two photographers can shoot the same subject in the exact same conditions and produce totally different images.

How? By inserting your interpretation and your perspective. Shoot what you love. Use The Golden Triangle or rule of thirds – nature is based upon these magical mathematical rules and they will elevate your work too. Don’t centre your subject (usually). Use space.

Simplify and exaggerate – you may wish to use contrasting colours, juxtaposition with other objects, even shutter speed to give a well-defined image/scene. Create depth and use leading lines to draw the viewer in and create a journey through the image.

Lighting is everything! Never shoot into the sun/ in the middle of the day unless you REALLY know what you’re doing. Understand the “temperature” of the light. Use the golden hours at sunrise and sunset – the light is beautiful. Edit yourself ruthlessly!

Closing date 31/07/20. Terms and conditions apply. Full competition rules will be available on the website shortly.

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Marie Morrison
Camera out and ready to go !
Friday, 21 June 2019 20:00
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Eggheads - programme schedule

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Horbury and Ossett's Great British Bake Off!

Horbury and Ossett's Great British Bake Off!

Horbury and Ossett NWR recently welcomed 2018 Great British Bake-Off Contestant Karen Wright to a special meeting.

We were delighted to welcome Karen Wright, contestant in this year’s Great British Bake-Off to our recent meeting. Karen grew up not far away in Featherstone, West Yorkshire. Her entertaining talk came about thanks to a family connection and with the series aired and winner announced she was now able to speak freely.

Karen describes herself as a self-taught baker and stalker of French patisserie window displays. From the thousands who applied Karen really didn’t expect to get selected for the final twelve. She gave us an insight into the application process. The first stage was a lengthy form with questions about baking experience, including everything from hot water crust pastry to bread. She set about teaching herself to do those things she couldn’t do. After sending in the application a researcher rang for a lengthy chat, including technical questions about baking. This lead to a regional selection day. For this Karen had to make two things in advance. It was for this she realised that you needed to go in with confidence regardless of nerves underneath. After all they were looking for a mix of people who could bake and appear on television. A few days later she heard she had been chosen for a further selection day in London. It was on the train to London that she first recognised Kim Joy from the earlier regional selection. In the end Yorkshire was well represented in the programme.

 

Once selected contestants received lots of information on what would be required at each stage of filming. This gave them time to practice ideas. Filming took place on two long intensive days over weekends during the summer. All the contestants were excited to meet up and finally get into the tent for the first time. The tent is actually full of film crews following each contestant. Two days filming is all edited down to an hour’s programme.

 

What was perhaps most inspiring was how Karen had seen it as a personal challenge, showing her that she could achieve much more than she imagined. She brought along her designs and photos of her cakes showing us her innate creativity. Karen is not sure where it will all lead, but she is already in demand for talks and demonstrations locally and has set up her own website. She will be appearing next year at the well-known Wakefield Rhubarb Festival in February. She is more than anything keen to inspire others young and old to try something new. Maybe we all need to follow her lead and pick a personal challenge for 2019 and reach outside our comfort zone!

 

We had decided in advance that those who wanted would be asked to make three scones to a recipe of our choosing. Our competition for the evening was not against the clock, but there was still a bit of pressure to come up with presentable scones for the evening. We had a good selection of both savoury and sweet ones and it showed how creative you can be, even with the humble scone. Karen was happy to judge our efforts.

Our member Thérése Manship was the winner. Here’s her winning recipe:

Christmas Scones

 

·         2 medium eggs

·         1 tsp vanilla extract

·         500g (18oz) plain flour

·         25g (1oz) baking power  

·         75g (3oz) golden caster sugar

·         finely grated zest of 1 orange

·         finely grated zest of 1 lemon

·         125g (4 ½ oz) unsalted butter chilled and diced

·         200g mixed fruit

·         Buttermilk, see recipe.

1. Whisk the eggs with the vanilla in a small bowl. Sift the flour and baking powder into the bowl of a food processor and add the sugar and zest. Add the butter and whiz to crumbs, then add the egg mixture and just enough buttermilk to bring the mixture together. Transfer to a large bowl and mix in the dried fruit. You can always add a little more buttermilk if the mixture appears dry and crumbly, but take care not to overdo it otherwise the scones will spread. 

2. Roll the dough out 2cm (¾ in) thick on a lightly floured worksurface and cut out scones using a 6.5 cm (2 ¾ in) cutter. Space well apart on one or two non-stick baking sheets and leave to rest for 20 minutes. 


3. Heat the oven to 200C/180C fan/gas 6, then brush the top of the scones with milk and bake for 17-22 minutes until golden (the lower tray may take a little longer than the top). 

The runner-up Angela Beardshall made cheese, pumpkin and poppy seeds scones with a rhubarb and ginger chutney.

We'd like to thank Karen for a most entertaining night!

You can find out more about Karen and future events, or contact her via her website:
www.karenwrightbakes.co.uk

You can also follow her on Instagram or Twitter @karenwrightbake

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