Theme 2015: Democracy, Liberty and Human Rights

Theme 2015: Democracy, Liberty and Human Rights

This year's theme is Democracy, Liberty and Human Rights. 2015 marks the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta. It was authenticated on June 19th 1215 at Runnymede by the Great Seal of King John.  

Magna Carta (meaning ‘Great Charter’) is often seen as the foundation of democracy in England. It was the first formal document stating that a King had to follow the laws of the land. It meant that the people of England could limit the power of a King, if he was doing things that were not good for the country.

It also guaranteed the rights of individuals. People could no longer be arrested, imprisoned or have their possessions taken away except by the judgement of their equals and/or the law of the land. This was the start of trial by jury.

Magna Carta contained 63 clauses when it was first granted but only three of those clauses remain part of English law. One defends the liberties and rights of the English Church, another confirms the liberties and customs of London and other towns, but the third is the most famous:

“No free man shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights or possessions, or outlawed or exiled, or deprived of his standing in any other way, nor will we proceed with force against him, or send others to do so, except by the lawful judgement of his equals or by the law of the land. To no one will we sell, to no one deny or delay right or justice.”

Where can you see it?

Four copies of Magna Carta still survive: one in Lincoln, one in Salisbury Cathedral and two at the British Library.

Useful links

Ideas for discussion

  • Human Rights Act 1998
  • European Convention on Human Rights
  • Charter 88
  • Modern slavery
  • Trafficking
  • Human rights in a time of terror
  • Public support for terror measures
  • Torture: myths and facts
  • UN Convention on the Rights of the Child
  • Child labour
  • Child soldiers
  • Smacking

Photo by courtesy of the British Library 

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Comments 3

Julie Berry on Monday, 16 February 2015 18:01

The website at Lincoln Castle Museum is a good starting point to investigate Magna Carta - http://www.visitlincoln.com/magnacarta see here for the series of lectures taking place this year.
When the visitor attraction opens in April - you can get a guided tour ( my colleague's wife is one of the volunteer guides).

There's a dedicated Magna Carta website : http://magnacarta800th.com/ which shows worldwide connections.

The website at Lincoln Castle Museum is a good starting point to investigate Magna Carta - http://www.visitlincoln.com/magnacarta see here for the series of lectures taking place this year. When the visitor attraction opens in April - you can get a guided tour ( my colleague's wife is one of the volunteer guides). There's a dedicated Magna Carta website : http://magnacarta800th.com/ which shows worldwide connections.
Kim Kitson on Wednesday, 18 February 2015 20:49

A good summary of King John and the Magna Carta can be found by watching Horrible Histories - Magna Carta Special on iPlayer. If you miss it you can listen to the songs that summarise it on YouTube "Horrible Histories New Song - Epic Magna Carta Rap Battle" and "Horrible Histories Song NEW! - Magna Carta 800 Years Song - CBBC"

A good summary of King John and the Magna Carta can be found by watching Horrible Histories - Magna Carta Special on iPlayer. If you miss it you can listen to the songs that summarise it on YouTube "Horrible Histories New Song - Epic Magna Carta Rap Battle" and "Horrible Histories Song NEW! - Magna Carta 800 Years Song - CBBC"
Judith Roddis on Sunday, 06 September 2015 11:28

If you live near Lincoln, a visit to the Castle is well worth the entrance fee. 5 of us visited recently. We viewed the Magna Carta and the Forest Charter in the new Magna Carta exhibition area which also shows 2 excellent videos explaining in an easy to understand way all about why this was written as well as subsequent events.
As well as this, the castle walls have been fully repaired and are wheelchair accessible via a lift (also good for those of us who don't like spiral staircases!), and the Victorian prison has also been renovated. An interesting visit.

If you live near Lincoln, a visit to the Castle is well worth the entrance fee. 5 of us visited recently. We viewed the Magna Carta and the Forest Charter in the new Magna Carta exhibition area which also shows 2 excellent videos explaining in an easy to understand way all about why this was written as well as subsequent events. As well as this, the castle walls have been fully repaired and are wheelchair accessible via a lift (also good for those of us who don't like spiral staircases!), and the Victorian prison has also been renovated. An interesting visit.
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