Online Events

FOR A COMPLETE BEGINNERS GUIDE TO USING ZOOM PLEASE CLICK ON THIS LINK 

·        Are your group not keeping in touch at moment?

·        Are you an independent member who would like to have contact with other members?

·        Is no-one in your group willing to try Zoom?

Then join us!

Some of our experienced members have volunteered to run some group Zoom meetings for members who do not have this option elsewhere. These meetings are open to members anywhere in the country, members who are affiliated to a local group as well as independent members. If you are missing out on group discussions then we would love to see you!

Numbers will be limited to 10 for each meeting (including the host) to allow for discussion.  For details of the latest sessions for MAY please log in.

Each week will have 2 sessions on the same theme - Wednesdays 7.30 - 9pm and Friday afternoons 2.30 - 4pm.

 To book a ticket for any of the talks please login to the MEMBERS DASHBOARD or go to 'Information for Members' tab in the members area and select 'Quizzes and Talks' from the drop down menu.


ONLINE TALKS

For booking links, please log in and click on the INFORMATION FOR MEMBERS tab and then select QUIZZES AND TALKS from the drop-down menu.

*Note for members* - booking information will be emailed to all members who have an email registered with us and are subscribed to our mailing list.  

 

Thursday 17 June 7pm

Questioning Marion

Marion Molteno has very kindly done several interviews for us now as part of her role as patron of NWR.

Her new book, Journeys Without a Map is being published in June and so she has agreed to a session which will solely consist of her answering the questions submitted by NWR members. There is a space on the booking form for you to submit any questions you would like to ask Marion about any of her work.

 

Tuesday 22 June 7 - 8.30pm

Diamond Street: The hidden world of Hatton Garden

In this illustrated talk writer and oral historian Rachel Lichtenstein discusses her book Diamond Street (Penguin, 2012) which intimately describes London’s secretive and mysterious jewellery quarter. In this ‘fascinating’ and ‘sparkling book’ you’ll meet diamond dealers and goldsmiths, jewellers and lapidaries as well as sewer flushers, artists, geologists and visionaries such as Iain Sinclair, as Rachel Lichtenstein reveals the history and stories that bring this vibrant Clerkenwell street and its environs to life. 

Intimately connected to the area both personally (through family) and professionally (as an archivist of London streets), Lichtenstein is uniquely placed to explore the extraordinary stories of this historic part of old London. She visits the London diamond bourse, underground gold vaults and Dickensian-looking jewellery workshops, as well as subterranean rivers, ancient burial sites and medieval crypts. For more information: www.rachellichtenstein.com

PLEASE NOTE - WHEN BOOKING A TICKET IT WILL SHOW THE DATE AS 4 MAY BUT THIS TALK IS ON 22 JUNE.  We are unfortunately unable to change the date as the event is now live.

 

Thursday 24 June 7pm

The Archers in Lockdown - A talk with Sunny Ormonde

Sunny has been playing the “outrageous and raunchy Lilian Bellamy” in BBC Radio 4’s The Archers since 2000 becoming one of the listeners’ favourite characters. Her antics have kept the nation entertained, whether it be riding round Ambridge on a Harley Davidson, drinking The Bull and the cider shed dry with Eddie Grundy, absconding to Costa Rica with her beloved, wicked Tiger, being oh so very naughty with Tiger’s brother Paul, or having furlong frolics with her handsome and very loaded knight Justin Elliot…Sunny will fill you in on all the behind the scenes stories about the world’s longest running soap opera – an evening of anecdotes, banter, and favourite pieces from Sunny’s long and distinguished acting career – humorous and touching in turn.

 

Tuesday 29 June 1.30 - 3pm

Girls in Science

Lakechia Jeanne is a Biomedical and Public Health Scientist with a background in Film and Television, she grew up as a child-actress working with the BBC, ITV, CBBC and BBC Radio. During her studies, she started Girls In Science- an initiative that portrays science-based careers specifically for females; and she uses her experience in media to convey the realities of professionals in academia and industry. www.GirlsInScience.co.uk now has an international team of passionate scientists working towards the acceleration of girls entering and succeeding in STEM.

The mission of Girls in Science is to delve into the lives of successful female scientists and find out a bit more about them in effort for girls and women to make accurate, informed decisions about our lives and educational choices. They want to present the realities of the variety of exciting careers in science, and then help people get there with tips and tricks and inspiring stories to keep us focused along the way. The Girls In Science Team are super passionate about making sure the local and national companies around us understand the expanding demographics of female Millenials and GenZs entering the workforce.

 

Thursday 1 July 7pm

Spicing up our lives

This is the fifth in our series of talks about everyday commodities and their fascinating histories with Sandy Leong.

Spices have been important to mankind for a long time, they have been used for culinary purposes, as preservatives and as medicine. At times they served as a currency - you could pay your rent in peppercorns; the quest for them caused wars and made men fortunes.

 

Tuesday 13 July 1.30pm

The story of Guy Fawkes

Beyond a tale of gunpowder, treason and plot, this virtual walking tour of York tells the comprehensive story of Guy Fawkes. Learn his family history in York, growing up, to the influences surrounding him as a Protestant and later a recusant Catholic.

Tour guide Vicki first became interested in Guy Fawkes in 2009, and her passion is one of the reasons that she moved to the city.  She interweaves her own personal journey of being diagnosed with stage 4b cancer, treatment, and remission, with the story of his life.

 

Tuesday 20 July 1.30 - 3.pm

Image of the black in London galleries - The Wallace Collection

Michael Ohajuru, Senior Fellow of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, returns with the third talk in his series - The Image of the Black in London Galleries. Image of the Black in London Galleries highlights the black presence to be found in the national art collections in London. 

There is a black presence in many of the works in the nation’s collections in London. That presence takes many different forms; blacks are depicted as musicians, as kings, as slaves, as servants, as saints and sometime just as people and even as artist in their own right. The Black Presence in most cases is explicit though, not immediate, and sometimes the presence has to be teased out, IBLG seeks to make that Black presence better known.

The Wallace Collection is the home of some of finest art, porcelain and furniture that western European artist and craftsmen have ever produced from the fourteenth century onwards. There is a Black presence to be found in many of the objects on display, both an overt and covert Black presence Additionally, we review their collection of looted art from Ghana in relation to similar stolen works in the British Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

 

Tuesday 21 September 1.30 - 3pm

Image of the black in London galleries: The Victoria and Albert Museum

Michael Ohajuru, Senior Fellow of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, returns with the fourth and final talk in his series - The Image of the Black in London Galleries. Michael highlights the black presence to be found in the national art collections in London. 

There is a black presence in many of the works in the nation’s collections in London. That presence takes many different forms; blacks are depicted as musicians, as kings, as slaves, as servants, as saints and sometime just as people and even as artist in their own right. The Black Presence in most cases is explicit, though not immediate, and sometimes the presence has to be teased out, IBLG seeks to make that Black presence better known.

The Victoria and Albert Museum – the first museum dedicated to design in the world - has objects dating from the thirteenth century to present in which form and function matter. There is a Black presence to be found in many of the pieces in its collection, it is to be found in sculpture, altar pieces, embroidery , paintings, stained glass, porcelain, jewellery and many other objects in its collection.

 

Tuesday 12 October 1.30 - 3pm

How 'Black Lives Matter' makes black culture matter

How the Black Lives Matter movement has impacted, enlivened and refocused the debate on repatriating stolen, sacred African treasures on display in the V&A, British Museum, Wallace Collection and other venues in America and the Far East

Michael Ohajuru, Senior Fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, presents how the Victorians plundered African treasures with a white - supremacist attitude based on their understanding of what they believed as their God given right - to 'civilise' a continent that they understood had no history. Systematically they plundered in the name of Christianity and when the real motive was capitalism - money and greed. This talk exposes the hypocrisy in the European philosophy towards Africa - a continent which according to their philosophers and historians had no history , no art and no literature. Hear how white male European intellectual elites and academics marvelled at the beauty and brilliance of the Benin treasures unable to believe that 'barbarians ' could produce such wonders: We were at once astounded at such an unexpected find, and puzzled to account for so highly developed an art among a race so entirely barbarous Sir Charles Hercules Read (1857 –1929) British archaeologist and curator at the British Museum. Black Lives Matter is making the establishment think again – this talk shows how things are changing.

 

Tuesday 9 November 1.30 - 3pm

Rembrandt's Blacks

Rembrandt lived on the same street as black folk, he and his followers painted them as noble human beings but that was not to last as the so-called Dutch Golden Age of the seventeenth century, founded on the exploitation of its colonies in the Americas and East Indies, unfolded.

Based on the recent HERE: Black in Rembrandt’s Time exhibition in Amsterdam this presentation exposes the change in presentation of the black figure from the centre of Golden Age portraiture to becoming marginalised, demonised in paintings as the Dutch economy flourished over the century from the profits of slavery. Today the Netherlands is coming to terms with that past.

This presentation exposes that change in representation and the journey the Netherland is on as it comes to terms with its history of slavery.

 

Tuesday 7 December 1.30 - 3pm

Misogynoir and the History of The Image of the African Woman in Western European Art

An illustrated presentation on how the image of the Black African woman was replaced in Western European Art and her journey back to centre stage. Beginning with how the image of Queen of Sheba and other black African women have been removed from canonical western art  An illustrated review of how the representations of the Bible's black women, Moses's Ethiopian wife and the Queen of Sheba and Ovid's black Andromeda, the daughter of the King of Ethiopia, have been handled in canonical western art by Titian, Veronese and others, how their images have become white, demonised or disappeared over time. Considering her movement from elimination during the Renaissance, anonymisation in the eighteenth and nineteenth century to the reclamations of her image in the twentieth century and celebration of her image in the twenty-first century. 

....if you want to know why we celebrate the Black King today yet there is no equivalent Black Queen in canonical works of art of Western Europe – then this talk is for you.